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Chrysler Airflow (1934)


Chrysler Airflow (1934)

The Airflow was the first production car to use wind-tunnel design testing, but it also had a number of other advances. The body was built in a similar way to an aircraft, with a steel beam and truss framework for the panels to mount on. It was very aerodynamic and helped a 1934 Imperial coupe model complete a flying mile of 95.6mph (154km/h) at Bonneville salt flats. The Airflow also had a unique gearbox, fitted with helical gears to make it exceptionally quiet. Later examples were fitted with hypoid rear axles and above 45mph (72km/h) when your foot was lifted off the accelerator, an overdrive gear would automatically engage. Another first was the puncture-proof tyres, which comprised Lifeguard tyres with heavy-duty tubes and a second floating tube inside that. The car was considered too radical for its time, and had poor sales, even when the front end was restyled in 1935.

Chrysler Airflow (1934) Specifications

Top speed:88 mph (141 km/h)
0-60 mph (0-96 km/h):19.5 sec
Engine type:In-line eight
Displacement:298 ci (4,883 cc)
Transmission:3-speed manual
Max power:122 bhp (91 kW) @ 3,400 rpm
Max torque:N/A
Weight:4,166 lb (1,893 kg)
Economy:16 mpg (5.66 km/I)
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